All posts in Business Travel

The perceived challenges of doing business in China

ExpertFlyer Hot Topics — Where the Rubber Meets the Runway

tim harcourt

The latest book from The Airport Economist, Tim Harcourt, shares the lessons he has learned travelling through Asia as an adviser to governments and trade missions, but has its beginnings in lessons he learned as a student at The University of Adelaide in South Australia.

Harcourt says, many of the students he lived with were from Singapore and Malaysia. They were very smart at math and econometrics and helped him get good grades.

A prized scholar at Adelaide, then Minnesota and Harvard University, Harcourt credits those friends for enlightening his interest in Asia.

These early lessons helped him realize that doing business in China is not as scary as commonly thought.

“Don’t be put off by the horror stories of non-payment in China,” he says. “You are more likely to lose your pants in the United States than your shirt in China.”

He also warns not to overplay the cultural issues.

“Even if you don’t speak Chinese it doesn’t mean you won’t be good. You just need to have a good niche, product,” Harcourt says. “But be realistic. Just because it’s China, you’re not going to suddenly sell 1.3 billion pairs of socks.”

Harcourts advises looking to second and third tier cities, which still have populations of around 15 million people.

“They are growing fast with plenty of urbanisation. Think construction, landscape gardening, education…” he says, adding that to land big contracts in secondary cities it’s best to seek the help of your country’s trade representatives to pave the way through municipal bureaucracy.

Harcourt’s final piece of advice is that to succeed overseas you can’t rely on luck.

“There is no trick to finding opportunities,” he says. “Be well prepared, flexible and do your homework. Don’t be afraid to ask for government help too.”

Preparation is key he says but adds that being flexible is also important. “Try not to overcook your strategic plan,” he says. “Innovation often comes from random thought. Over-thinking can hinder action. Get out there, try things and do it!”

With a good story, and country specific practical tips Harcourt says that Trading Places will help businesspeople wanting to take the next step in international business get started.

“I hope people reading it will become more knowledgeable about the world and more confident about going offshore. They may even have a laugh at the same time!”

Tim Harcourt’s new book, Trading Places: The Airport Economist’s Guide to International Business hits the shelves on 1 Oct. Come back next week for part two with Tim where we get the inside track on doing business in India.

How The Hotel Industry is Adapting to Meet Today’s Modern Business Traveler

ExpertFlyer Hot Topics — Where the Rubber Meets the Runway

businesswoman running with luggageThe face of the modern business traveler has changed. For one, it is increasingly female – women are the fastest-growing segment among business travelers in the U.S., accounting for nearly half of the market. It is also getting younger – Millennials currently make up an upwards of 35% of the workforce and are expected to soon surpass Boomers in overall travel spending. It is also more often seen working in the lobby and public spaces rather than tucked away in a guest room. Hotels, among other travel industry companies like booking sites and DMOs, are being forced to look at their branding, business models and communications methods to meet the needs of this modern business traveler.

The business travelers of today – especially the ever expanding Millennial market – are looking for flexible work spaces with high-speed and complimentary Wi-Fi, where they have the option to work and network, enjoy a good meal, cocktail or cup of coffee and be as social as they choose. They aren’t looking for cookie cutter experiences, but to discover something new, different or unique with each hotel stay – from the design to culinary offerings or craft beer and cocktail selections at the bar.

Hospitality brands like Sonesta, a global collection of 55 properties in eight countries, have taken notice, and aim to deliver a guest experience that is different, and flexible to meet each guest’s needs – from business to leisure travelers.

According to Mark Sherwin, Executive Vice President Operations for Sonesta, the brand is “passionate about offering guests a sense of place, not just a place to stay.” Sherwin says there is “no typical Sonesta, but a portfolio full of diverse and distinctive properties as individual as its guests.”

A bold and independent-minded aesthetic is woven throughout the hotel’s guest experience, from lobbies and dining experiences to rooms – all also conveniently fitted with complimentary Wi-Fi for guests. Bright, vibrant tones are being carefully selected in design updates to brighten the mood, provide light and airy spaces and inspire creativity during each stay.

Read this CNN post for another perspective on the Makings of a Modern Business Traveler.

 

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“Unmanage” your travel to slash costs and earn cash

ExpertFlyer Hot Topics — Where the Rubber Meets the Runway

main watching plane at airportIt’s a popular misconception that companies will lose out on business travel discounts if they use an open travel platform. Finding a company who provides business rates with an open booking platform is tricky. Even harder to find is one paying cash back on just about every booking, every flight, every hotel, and every rental.

ExpertFlyer caught up with Shannon Fore, Director of National Accounts at Global Travel for Business, a unique unmanaged business travel booking engine that purports to provide a wealth of travel product and cash back incentives.  According to Fore, there is no doubt a cost associated with traditional managed travel. Some companies charge per employee, per month, some charge a flat annual fee based on corporate size, as well as reporting capabilities. For example, many managed travel companies charge a per transaction service fee of $25-$55. So, if a company does 3,000 transactions a year this amounts to a bill of $165,000 just to pick up the phone! The determining factor in whether or not this Managed platform cost is worth its weight in gold can be summed up in terms of savings. Do the savings outweigh the costs?

Fore says, based on her research, that unmanaged travelers spend a third less per trip compared to managed travelers. It was also determined that unmanaged or open travel bookers experienced a higher level of employee satisfaction since, in fact, they were in charge of their trip — down to seat choice, hotel choice and carrier choice. The alternative is being at the mercy of a managed travel booker who carries the purse strings, as well as criterion which goes with there company travel policy.

Faced with increasing travel costs, tax hikes, fuel surcharges and the like, companies are urgently looking for savings opportunities more than ever. Seems like now’s a good time to explore options, such as open travel platforms that have no set up fee, no transaction fees and no monthly service fees.

“Did you know…The Guy in the Window Seat Wants to Talk to You?”

talking on a placeWhy don’t airline passengers, sitting inches apart for hours on end, utter a single word to one another?  Most likely, because we assume that the other person doesn’t want to talk and we rather not risk annoying anyone.

Since the ups and downs of air travel always pique our interest, we were drawn in by a recent New York Times article written by Jeff Kaye, a co-C.E.O. of the executive search firm Kaye/Bassman-Sanford Rose Associates and C.E.O. of the recruiting training company, Next Level Exchange.  Since the 1990s, Jeff has been contradicting the assumption that our seat mates don’t want to engage.  In fact, he says, about 90% of people DO like to chat and share.  Since Jeff travels all the time and all around the world for business, he makes a regular habit of greeting fellow passengers and asking a few polite questions.  In addition to interesting company, he’s been rewarded with advice, recommendations and anecdotes that made the trip fly and in many cases left him a little bit smarter.

Next time you’re on a plane, say hello to your seat mate.  You never know where the conversation will take you.  Read the entire story here: http://ht.ly/t21aq