All posts in Airlines

ExpertFlyer Top Tweets

ExpertFlyer Top TweetsRecent Tweets People Are Reading from @ExpertFlyer

British Airways’ Austin-London route appears to be a success 

Internet memes come out to play in Delta safety video

The future of airline fees: What you’re likely to pay more for

Alitalia Not To Renew Its Air France-KLM Partnership 

JetBlue launching daily service to Mexico City 

Monsters invade San Francisco International Airport

Airlines says this will be the busiest summer ever for air travel

Southwest Announces New International and Domestic Flights 

ExpertFlyer Top Tweets

ExpertFlyer Top TweetsRECENT TWEETS PEOPLE ARE READING FROM @EXPERTFLYER.COM

Airline pilot says quick-fix proposals after Germanwings crash are reckless ht.ly/L3hug

Alaska Airlines Strikes Back at Delta With New JFK Service ift.tt/1EZQ8Yi

Aer Lingus focus on transatlantic a deterrent for Etihad: chief ift.tt/1NzexIX

How Not to Catch a Cold on a Plane ift.tt/1BXYv4u

Thai carriers face scrutiny on safety, bans on new flights ift.tt/1ONqQVi

Germanwings crash pilot concealed illness: prosecutor ift.tt/1EatsJN

Norwegian moves to keep two crew in cockpit at all times ift.tt/1OB4VAJ

Who owns the armrest between two people sitting in a plane?

ExpertFlyer Hot Topics — Where the Rubber Meets the Runway

Graphic is man stuck in the middle seat

Graphic: Christoph Hitz

Just because you’re a road warrior, doesn’t mean you have to go to war over the little things. Let’s take one point of contention out of the cabin: Armrest ownership.  Is there an unwritten code of ethics for determining dibs on the armrest?  There’s a reason why we make it our business to help travelers get out of the middleseat — it’s a bummer being squashed in between two strangers for hours. Since a “middleseater” is already at a comfort disadvantage, it seems only fair that armrest rights should be all theirs.

We did some digging on Quora to see if this conundrum had been discussed with any resolution.  Here are some interesting thoughts:

Wirawan Winarto offers a rule of thumb…”Window Seat gets the view; Aisle Seat gets the access; Middle Seat gets the armrest.”

Jeff Chou says, “For two seats: Whoever gets there first. If you both arrive at the same time, rock it off. Leaving your seat forfeits rights to the armrest (lifting your arm momentarily to lift the tray table or otherwise, does not count).

For three seats:
Middle gets both armrests. Aisle gets one armrest and a little bit of legroom, window gets one armrest and a window.”

What do you say? Read more of the Quora thread here.

ExpertFlyer Top Tweets

ExpertFlyer Top TweetsRecent Tweets People are Reading from @ExpertFlyer.com

What is the world’s top airport? Survey says … ift.tt/1B8u5Mt

Lufthansa flies first Premium Economy-equipped A380 ift.tt/1NLnGkD

FAA Updates Runway Safety Area Efforts at Airports ift.tt/18A9jPg

Delta to further trim Cincinnati flight schedule ift.tt/1B1zSDu

2014 jet accident rate lowest in history, IATA says ift.tt/1GCfgKr

Yes, those are AA Dreamliners in the skies over West Texas ift.tt/1EKjpK5

BA to retrofit newer A320s with sharklet wing-tips ift.tt/1MeTk8t

Frequent Business Traveler Trends for 2015

ExpertFlyer Hot Topics — Where the Rubber Meets the Runway

The ups and downs of business travelers carry important weight and vast economic impact in the US.  According to a research report published in 2013 by the U.S. Travel Association with research conducted by Oxford Economics, business travel spending by U.S. companies in 2012 generated an estimated $524 billion in business sales, supporting 3.7 million jobs with an annual payroll of $152 billion.

We recently interviewed Jonathan Spira, editorial director at Frequent Business Traveler Magazine and senior managing director at research firm, Accura Media Group, regarding his firm’s 2015  Frequent Business Traveler research report.

Among the key highlights of the report, almost half of business travelers surveyed said they plan on taking more trips in 2015 as compared to 2014, while a similar number said they anticipate taking more trips in 2015 than they did two years ago in 2013.

This translates into a rather significant increase given a business traveler population in the United States that takes over 450 million domestic trips a year.

Spira’s report concludes that loyalty to both airlines and hotels remains largely unchanged over the past three years. In the most recent survey, 75.3% of travelers say they prefer to stay at a particular brand of hotel, an increase of 2.7 percentage points over last year. The number of travelers who prefer to fly with a particular airline or alliance, 92%, remains statistically unchanged over the course of the survey.

Frequent travelers are avid users of technology. Nine out of ten report doing all of the following over a twelve-month period:

  • Researched information about flights
  • Researched information about hotels
  • Made a flight reservation
  • Made a hotel reservation
  • Checked a flight’s status

Working with popular online travel community, FlyerTalk, more than 1,700 business travelers participated in the study. The outcomes suggest  a significant turning point for business travelers, as well as the travel industry. Change is prevalent, from airline mergers to significant changes in airline and hotel loyalty programs, to new imperatives for amenities and services that the business traveler demands.

A complete copy of the 40-page report, 2015 Frequent Business Traveler Business Travel Outlook Report, is available online here.