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Air travelers use Knee Defender to protect their legroom

ExpertFlyer Hot Topics — Where the Rubber Meets the Runway

Has “recline rage” spun out of control?  It seems so after a flurry of news reports featuring enraged passengers, flight diversions and disorderly conduct over the comfort and legroom infringement of seat recliners vs. seat “reclinees.”  An age-old dilemma that, up until now, had only grousing for relief.  Enter the latest super-hero to the beleaguered air traveler: Knee Defender.

Knee Defender

Knee Defender

What is the Knee Defender?

It’s a small plastic clamp about the length of a key that attaches to the airplane seat tray table to effectively disable the seat in front of you from reclining back into your space.

About $22, the company says it helps you defend the space you need when confronted by a faceless, determined seat recliner who doesn’t care how long your legs are or about anything else that might be “back there”.

But what about the rights of the recliner?  Some airlines, like Air Canada, Quantas, among others, have banned the device.  What do you think? Whose rights should come first?

Knee Defender says, if the airlines will not protect people from being battered, crunched, and immobilized…then people need options to protect themselves.

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“Did you know…Southwest Airlines Has Left The Country?”

(Airchive.com)

Southwest airlines

Photo: (cc) Dylan Ashe

For more than 40 years, Southwest Airlines has made its mark as a reliable – and fun – domestic carrier.  Lately, its growth has put it ahead of competition, so much so that Southwest currently flies more domestic passengers in the United States than any of its rivals.  This week, Southwest launched its first international flight, departing from Baltimore, and landing in Montego Bay, Jamaica.

Since its acquisition of AirTran Airways in 2011, Southwest has had the ability to cross US borders using AirTran’s existing routes into seven international destinations within Mexico and the Caribbean.

So, why the wait? According to a report from airline industry news site, Airchive.com, Southwest wanted to make sure that it was done right, and a lot of work had to be done.

“Although the formal celebration was held in Baltimore, Southwest also launched international flights today from Atlanta and Orlando to Aruba, The Bahamas, and Jamaica, but this is just the beginning.

Starting August 10th, the Dallas-based airline will begin operating daily service from Cancun, Mexico to Atlanta and Baltimore BWI, along with Saturday service to Milwaukee. San Jose del Cabo will receive daily service from Santa Ana, while Nassau, Bahamas will see Saturday only service to Atlanta.

The carrier will further expand international flights in October, operating daily service from Cancun to Denver starting on the 7th, and San Jose del Cabo to Denver on the 11th.”

Read the full story on airchive.com here.